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olive® Camera

Technical Specifications

Feature CategoryFeature SubcategorySpecification
Form FactorDimensions (W x H x D)40mm x 40mm x 30mm
Weight89 grams
Processor UnitApplication ProcessorDual Cortex-A7 up to 800 MHz
Real-Time ProcessorCortex-M4 MPU up to 200 MHz
TPU AI Accelerator4 Trillion Operations Per Second
MemoryOn Chip (SoC)512 MB RAM
On Chip EEPROM (SoC)512 Bytes x 8
On SOM64 GByte SD Flash
SensorsImage Sensor1/2.7" OmniVision OV2710
Max Resolution1920(H)x1080(V) pixels
Lens2.1mm (L210) / 1.8mm (L180)
Frame Rate640x480 VGA @120fps, 1280x720 HD @60fps, 1920x1080 FHD @30fps
IMU Sensor6-Axis Automotive-Proven IMU
IMU Range & SensitivityAccelerometer: 0.06 mg/LSB, Gyroscope: 0.004 dps/LSB
ConnectivityHigh-Speed Connectivity1x Virtual Ethernet USB Type C @ 60 MBps
Other I/O1x User Switch, 3x User LEDs
SoftwareYocto BSPAvailable for batch purchases
Linux KernelLinux 5.10
Operating SystemDebian 11
Communication middlewareApache Cyclone DDS
Robotic Operating SystemsROS Noetic Ninjemys, ROS 2 Humble Hawksbill
Power and ThermalPower ConsumptionUSB Type C PD (15 W max)
VoltagePD 5.0v
Max Current3000mA
Temperature RangeCommercial: 0°C to 85°C, Industrial: -40°C to +85°C

TPU

A TPU, or Tensor Processing Unit, is a type of AI accelerator specifically designed by Google to accelerate machine learning tasks. TPUs are application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs) that have been optimized for the efficient execution of tensor operations, which are fundamental to deep learning and other machine learning algorithms.

The primary goal of a TPU is to enhance the performance and energy efficiency of machine learning workloads, allowing AI models to be trained and executed more quickly and with lower power consumption than traditional CPU or GPU-based hardware. This is achieved through a combination of specialized hardware components and optimizations tailored to the unique requirements of machine learning tasks.

Enable / Disable TPU acceleration

In order to enable the tpu chip do

./opt/olive/script/enable_tpu.sh
./opt/olive/script/enable_tpu.sh

and to disable the tpu do

./opt/olive/script/disable_tpu.sh
./opt/olive/script/disable_tpu.sh

to verify the TPU is enabled you can do

lsusb
lsusb

The result will be:

Bus 001 Device 004: ID 1a6e:089a Global Unichip Corp.
Bus 001 Device 003: ID 32e4:9230 HD USB Camera HD USB Camera
Bus 001 Device 002: ID 1a40:0101 Terminus Technology Inc. Hub
Bus 001 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0002 Linux Foundation 2.0 root hub
Bus 002 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0001 Linux Foundation 1.1 root hub
Bus 001 Device 004: ID 1a6e:089a Global Unichip Corp.
Bus 001 Device 003: ID 32e4:9230 HD USB Camera HD USB Camera
Bus 001 Device 002: ID 1a40:0101 Terminus Technology Inc. Hub
Bus 001 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0002 Linux Foundation 2.0 root hub
Bus 002 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0001 Linux Foundation 1.1 root hub

Which the "Global Unichip Corp" is the TPU chip.

TPU Apps

All the python3 based TPU examples are located in /home/olive/apps. To run an object detection example using TPU after enabling the tpu in the previus step run

python3 /home/olive/apps/packages/src/app_tpu_python/tpu_python/app_node.py
python3 /home/olive/apps/packages/src/app_tpu_python/tpu_python/app_node.py

INFO

Note that you have to change the topic name of the app subscriber to your current device topic name in oder to subscribe to the image. In order to to this you have to edit the app_node.py

After running this example the camera will detect objects based on Coral object detection example.

olive_camera_rqt_topics!

General pipeline diagram

tpu_diagram!

For more information about Google® coral please visit:

https://coral.ai/examples/

For other python example source projects please visit:

https://github.com/olive-robotics/olv_camera_tpu_playground_py

General Setup

Follow the Quick Start Guide for Olive Robotics robot modules to connect the device and start using it.

Quick Setup

Quick start guide for the olive® Camera module:

  1. Check if the data is alreaddy published to your system using:

    ros2 topic list
    ros2 topic list

    you should be able to see all the topics published from the module. For exampe for IMU module you will see:

    /olive/imu/id01/image/camera_info
    /olive/imu/id01/image/compressed
    /olive/imu/id01/imu
    /olive/imu/id01/magnetometer
    /olive/imu/id01/status
    /olive/imu/id01/switch
    /olive/imu/id01/led
    /parameter_events
    /rosout
    /olive/imu/id01/image/camera_info
    /olive/imu/id01/image/compressed
    /olive/imu/id01/imu
    /olive/imu/id01/magnetometer
    /olive/imu/id01/status
    /olive/imu/id01/switch
    /olive/imu/id01/led
    /parameter_events
    /rosout

INFO

The number id01 is your device's default namespace.

  1. Visualize the data using:

    1. Embedded Web Interface (https://docs.olive-robotics.com/software/gui/gui.html)

    2. rqt (https://docs.ros.org/en/humble/Tutorials/Beginner-CLI-Tools/Introducing-Turtlesim/Introducing-Turtlesim.html#install-rqt)

      • Visualize the topics: olive_camera_rqt_topics!

      • Plot the data from the IMU messages: olive_camera_rqt_imu!

      • Visualize the Image: olive_camera_rqt_image!

      • Change the parameters of the DCM: olive_camera_rqt_param!

    3. rviz2 (https://github.com/ros2/rviz).

      • Visualize the IMU data in Rviz2 olive_rviz_imu!
  2. Visualize the data and change the parameters like IP, Topic Name, etc using the embedded web interface. You just need to open your browser on your host computer and enter the IP address of the device. If you didn't change the IP address, then it must be 10.42.0.7.

ROS Topics and Services

Topic NameMessage TypeTypeDescription
.../image/camera_infosensor_msgs/CameraInfoPublisherCamera image information
.../image/compressedsensor_msgs/CompressedImagePublisherCamera image
.../imusensor_msgs/ImuPublisherMessured acc/gyro/quaternion
.../magnetometersensor_msgs/MagneticFieldPublisherMessured Magnetic field.
.../statusdiagnostic_msgs/DiagnosticStatusPublisherDevice status.
.../switchstd_msgs/BoolPublisherDevice micro-switch status.
.../ledstd_msgs/BoolSubscriberUser defined LED.

Advanced Settings

The device allows certain parameters to be changed at runtime. To get an overview of all changeable parameters use ros2 param list. To change a parameter use ros2 param set /dcm_camera <parameter> <new_value>

Camera

ParameterTypeRange MinRange MaxDefaultDescription
frequencyint012030Camera publish rate
brightnessdouble0.01.00.5Camera brightness parameter
contrastdouble0.01.00.5Camera contrast parameter
saturationdouble0.01.00.5Camera saturation parameter
gammadouble0.01.00.5Camera gamma parameter
whitebalancedouble0.01.00.5Camera whitebalance parameter
resolutionstring"320x240""1920x1080""640x480"Camera image resolution

IMU

ParameterTypeRange MinRange MaxDefaultDescription
filter_frequencyint01200100IMU filter frequency
filter_gainint010.2IMU filter gain
frequency_imuint01200100IMU publish rate
frequency_magint0100100Magnetometer publish rate

System

ParameterTypeRange MinRange MaxDefaultDescription
frequencyint01010System status publish rate

Parameter GUI

RIG Reconfigure

The GitHub repository "rig_reconfigure" by teamspatzenhirn is a GUI tool designed for editing ROS 2 parameters at runtime. This tool seems to be specifically aimed at managing and modifying the parameters within ROS 2, a popular robotics middleware framework, providing a graphical interface for ease of use. The repository is public and licensed under the MIT license, indicating open-source availability. The primary programming languages used in the project are C++ and CMake. For more details, you can visit the repository here.

  1. Install from apt
sudo apt install ros-humble-rig-reconfigure
sudo apt install ros-humble-rig-reconfigure
  1. Run the rig
ros2 run rig_reconfigure rig_reconfigure
ros2 run rig_reconfigure rig_reconfigure
  1. It will show your ros2 parameters and you can edit them simply

olive_rig!

Advanced setup

Olix-OS Real-Time Linux for Robotics

Olix-OS Linux is a version of the Linux operating system that is optimized for use on embedded systems, which are small, resource-constrained devices that are used in a wide range of applications such as industrial automation, consumer electronics, and the Internet of Things (IoT).

Olix-OS Linux is typically built using a small subset of the Linux kernel and a minimal set of user-space utilities and libraries. This allows it to run on devices with limited memory and processing power, and it also reduces the size of the operating system, making it more suitable for embedded systems.

Olix-OS Linux can be built using various build systems such as Yocto Project, Buildroot, and OpenEmbedded. These build systems provide pre-configured Linux distributions, which can be customized to suit the specific requirements of the embedded system. They also provide a set of tools for building and managing the Linux system, including the kernel, bootloader, and user-space utilities and libraries.

Olix-OS Linux is also highly configurable, which allows developers to fine-tune the operating system to meet the specific requirements of the embedded system. This includes configuring the kernel and user-space libraries, optimizing the system for performance, and selecting the appropriate drivers and software components.

One of the advantages of using Olix-OS Linux is that it is open-source, which means that developers have access to the source code of the operating system and can modify it to suit their needs. Additionally, embedded Linux has a large and active community of developers, which means that there is a wealth of documentation, support, and development tools available.

Overall, embedded Linux is a versatile and powerful operating system that is well-suited for use on embedded systems. It provides a small footprint and configurability, as well as a large library of pre-built software, making it a popular choice for developers and manufacturers alike.

Bridge Image

Firmware Releases

FormatVersionLink
Compressed IMG1.3.2download
Compressed IMG2.2.0download

How can i see what is my current Software Patch?

In the Olive GUI dashboard in the device status group box you can see your current firmware version.

Flashing a New Image with Etcher Software

Introduction

Etcher is a free and open-source utility used to write image files such as .iso and .img files, as well as zipped folders onto storage media to create live SD cards and USB flash drives. It's widely used to flash OS images for Raspberry Pi, Arduino, and many other applications. Etcher is developed by balena, and it's available for Windows, macOS, and Linux.

Prerequisites

  • An image file you want to flash, typically with a .iso or .img extension. (unzip the firmware file if it is compressed)
  • A USB drive or SD card with enough storage to accommodate the image file. (32 Gb or more)
  • A computer with Etcher installed.

Step-by-Step Guide to Flashing an Image with Etcher

Step 1: Download and Install Etcher

  • Navigate to Etcher's official download page.
  • Choose the version of Etcher that corresponds to your operating system (Windows/macOS/Linux).
  • Download the installer and run it. Follow the on-screen instructions to install Etcher on your system.

Step 2: Prepare Your USB Drive or SD Card

  • Insert the USB drive or SD card into your computer.
  • Ensure that there is no important data on the drive, as the flashing process will erase everything on it.

Step 3: Open Etcher and Select Image

  • Open Etcher on your computer.
  • Click on the “Flash from file” button.
  • Navigate to the location where your image file is stored, select it, and click “Open” (or an equivalent, depending on your OS).

Step 4: Select Target

  • Click on the “Select target” button.
  • Choose your USB drive or SD card from the list. Be very careful to select the correct drive, as all data on the drive will be erased.
  • Click “Connect” (or equivalent).

Step 5: Flash the Image

  • Click on the “Flash!” button.
  • Etcher will format the drive and write the image file to the USB drive or SD card. This process may take some time, depending on the size of the image file and the speed of the drive.
  • Once the flashing process is complete, Etcher will validate the write to ensure it was successful.

Step 6: Eject Safely

  • Once the flashing process is complete and validated, you can close Etcher.
  • Eject the USB drive or SD card safely from your computer.

Step 7: Use the Flashed Drive

  • You can now use the USB drive or SD card to boot a computer or power a device (such as a Raspberry Pi) depending on the image you flashed.

Troubleshooting Tips

  • If Etcher fails to flash the image, try using a different USB port or card reader.
  • Ensure that the image file is not corrupted. You might re-download the file or check its integrity if possible.
  • Make sure your USB drive or SD card has enough space for the image file.
  • If you experience persistent issues, consult the Etcher's GitHub repository or community forums for assistance.

Patch Update

Releases

FormatVersionCompatible FirmwareLinkNote
SWU8091.3.2download-
SWU8472.2.0download-
SWU8482.2.0download-
SWU10042.2.0downloadIMU v2.0
SWU10252.2.0downloadIMU v2.1
SWU10262.2.0downloadIMU v2.1 (No Magnetometer / Relative AHRS)

1) If you are updating a patch for the first on a fresh OlixOS

Fist open the update screen on your browser by going to <device_ip>:7070

then browse or drag and drop the (.swu) file olive_one_x.swu to the upload area. Then wait for a minute to software patch updater applies the software patch on your fresh OlixOS.

2) If you are updating a patch on a working OlixOS

Fist open the update screen by simply going to <device_ip> then select the Firmware Update from the left panel.

then browse or drag and drop the (.swu) file olive_one_x.swu to the upload area. Then wait for a minute to software patch updater applies the software patch on your current OlixOS.

Bridge Image

How can i see what is my current Software Patch?

In the Olive GUI dashboard in the device status group box you can see your current software patch version

Environment Variables

In Olive components the permanent Environment Variables are located in:

/opt/olive/script/env.sh

In order to add your custom Environment variable you should declare it in this script, for example:

declare -x ROS_DOMAIN_ID="0"

SSH

How to log in

Logging in to a Linux real-time Olix-OS system using SSH (Secure Shell) is a common method for remotely accessing and managing the system. SSH is a secure protocol that allows you to remotely access the command line of a Linux system over a network connection.

To log in to a Linux real-time Olix-OS system using SSH, you will need a computer or device with an SSH client installed, and the IP address or hostname of the Olix-OS system.

The first step is to open the terminal or command prompt on your computer and type the command ssh olive@<IP_address> or ssh olive@<hostname> and press enter. This will initiate an SSH connection to the Olix-OS system.

Once the connection is established, you will be prompted for the password for the user account olive. You will need to enter the password one and press enter.

After providing the correct credentials, you will be logged in to the Olix-OS system and will have access to the command line interface. You can then issue commands to the Olix-OS system and perform various tasks such as configuring the system, managing files and processes, and monitoring system performance.

It's also important to note that SSH uses encryption to secure the communication between the client and the server, which means that your login credentials and data transmitted during the session will be protected against eavesdropping.

It's also important to mention that, depending on the real-time Olix-OS Linux distribution, the SSH daemon might not be enabled by default. It's recommended to check the system configuration and the usage of ssh service on the Olix-OS Linux before trying to connect to the system.

Network Configuration

1) Indipended device connection

You can set and update your device IP, netmask and gateway from the device dashboard GUI. More information Here:

Olive GUI Dashboard

olive_network!

2) Multi-Device Interoperability

Multi-Device / Servo Daisy Chain

When you connect multiple Olive components to your computer, they will appear as several Ethernet devices in your network adapter settings. In this configuration, it's necessary to either set up an internal network bridge or define static routes to ensure all devices are properly connected to your computer and can be pinged.

Daisy chain means you have an Olive servo in your setup and therefore you will need the Olive power spliter too. You can see the example network diagram below. Please note that the Olive camera in the daisy chain will work without automatically but for the IMU you will need to setup the connection manually.

olive_network!

Alternatively, you can daisy-chain multiple servos, adding a camera or IMU at the end of the chain. In daisy chain mode, network bridging is handled automatically, requiring no additional configuration.

In summary, using the daisy chain method results in only one Ethernet device being visible in your network device list, but you can still access and ping all devices in the chain. Conversely, connecting multiple components without daisy-chaining will show multiple devices in your network list. This arrangement typically requires manual setup, involving the creation of a bridge network or the definition of static routes to integrate all Ethernet interfaces connected to Olive components. Follow the relevant procedures to establish this setup.

Solution 1 (Statics Routing)

if this is your example network setup:

olive_network!

[imu 1: 10.42.0.7] => [pc interface: 10.42.0.1]
[imu 2: 10.42.0.8] => [pc interface: 10.42.0.2]
[imu 1: 10.42.0.7] => [pc interface: 10.42.0.1]
[imu 2: 10.42.0.8] => [pc interface: 10.42.0.2]

then on your main pc try:

sudo ip route add 10.42.0.7 via 10.42.0.1
sudo ip route add 10.42.0.8 via 10.42.0.2
sudo ip route add 10.42.0.7 via 10.42.0.1
sudo ip route add 10.42.0.8 via 10.42.0.2

Solution 2 (Network Bridge)

  1. Install the bridge-utils package:

sudo apt install bridge-utils

  1. First use the command "ifconfig" to see your current network interfaces:
ifconfig
ifconfig

As you can see in our example we have two Olive devices (enxa80000000001) and (enxa82c8d3c047b). We want to create a single bridge to internally connect this two interfaces and represents them with one ip address.

bridge1!

  1. Open the Network Manager connection editor GUI:

nm-connection-editor

bridge2!

click on (+) and select "Bridge" from the list

bridge3!

  1. In the Bridge connection Editor add your Olive network interfaces. Each time select "Add" then select "Ethernet"

bridge4!

bridge5!

from the device list select the Olive devices by the interface name or the MAC address. Here (enxa80000000001) and (enxa82c8d3c047b).

bridge6!

Once you done this step you will two interfaces in the list

bridge7!

  1. Change the Bridge ip to manual mode and define a static ip like:

bridge8!

It is better to select "10.42.0.x" or better "10.42.0.1" as shown in the picture.

  1. Remove extra (old) netwrok connections.

bridge9!

bridge10!

  1. Check the bridge connection:

sudo brctl show

This should display the bridge connection status between the Olive components.

bridge11!

  1. Test the connection with the "ping" command to ensure eveything is correct. In our case the first component has the ip address "10.42.0.7" and the second one has "10.42.0.8".

bridge13!

Internet Sharing

Windows

  1. First, open the Network Manager and identify your Olive network interface (in this case, "network 39"). Also, identify the interface through which you wish to share the internet (in this context, the WiFi).

Bridge Image

  1. Next, access the settings of the WiFi network. Navigate to the appropriate tab and select the "Internet Sharing" feature. From the dropdown list, choose the Olive interface (in this instance, "network 39").

a3!

  1. Once again, open the network settings for the Olive interface. Proceed to the IPv4 configuration and modify the predefined IP to match the default gateway IP of the Olive interface. By default, the gateway value is set to 10.42.0.1.

a4!

a5!

a6!

  1. Now, SSH into the Olive component and attempt to ping 8.8.8.8 to verify your internet connection. If successful, you should observe a successful ping response as shown below:

a7!

  1. If you wish to change the default gateway on the device, follow these commands on the Olive component:
sudo ip route del default #delete the default route
sudo ip route add default via 10.42.0.1 #add the default route
sudo ip route del default #delete the default route
sudo ip route add default via 10.42.0.1 #add the default route

Linux Method 1 (Wi-Fi internet sharing)

  1. Install Necessary Packages: Before you begin, ensure you have the net-tools and dnsmasq packages installed. These tools will help manage and share the network.
sudo apt update
sudo apt install net-tools dnsmasq
sudo apt update
sudo apt install net-tools dnsmasq
  1. Use the following command to list your network interfaces:
ifconfig
ifconfig
  1. Use the commands bellow to share your wifi internet (here wlp3s0) with you olive interface (here enxa80000000001). Replace this two interface names according to your wifi and olive interface name.
sudo sysctl -w net.ipv4.ip_forward=1
sudo iptables -t nat -A POSTROUTING -o wlp3s0 -j MASQUERADE
sudo iptables -A FORWARD -i enxa80000000001 -o wlp3s0 -j ACCEPT
sudo apt-get install iptables-persistent
sudo sysctl -w net.ipv4.ip_forward=1
sudo iptables -t nat -A POSTROUTING -o wlp3s0 -j MASQUERADE
sudo iptables -A FORWARD -i enxa80000000001 -o wlp3s0 -j ACCEPT
sudo apt-get install iptables-persistent
  1. Verify Internet Sharing: SSH into the Olive component and try pinging an external server to check if the internet connection is shared:
sudo ping 8.8.8.8
sudo ping 8.8.8.8

Linux Method 2 (Lan internet sharing)

  1. Install Necessary Packages: Before you begin, ensure you have the net-tools and dnsmasq packages installed. These tools will help manage and share the network.
sudo apt update
sudo apt install net-tools dnsmasq
sudo apt update
sudo apt install net-tools dnsmasq
  1. Use the following command to list your network interfaces:
ifconfig
ifconfig
  1. Configure Network Manager:
  • Open the Network Manager GUI.
  • Identify your primary internet connection.
  • Also, identify the Olive network interface you wish to share the internet with.
  1. Set Up Internet Sharing:
  • Go to the settings of your primary internet connection.
  • Navigate to the "IPv4" tab.
  • Choose the "Shared to other computers" option from the "Method" dropdown menu.
  1. Restart Network Manager: After making the changes, restart the Network Manager to apply them:
sudo service network-manager restart
sudo service network-manager restart
  1. Verify Internet Sharing: SSH into the Olive component and try pinging an external server to check if the internet connection is shared:
sudo ping 8.8.8.8
sudo ping 8.8.8.8

Time Synchronization

Set the device time manually

In order to set the time manually, you can open the GUI on the Olive device and click on the "Set Time" button. This will synchronize the device time with your computer's time manually. This is useful when you wish to install a package on the device, as for online services and security protocols like HTTPS, synchronization with the current time is essential; otherwise, errors may occur during security handshaking. If you prefer a more automatic and permanent solution, consider running an NTP server on your host computer and defining the NTP server address for Olive. Subsequently, Olive will automatically synchronize the time with the server using the NTP Client.

a8!

Set the Time using Network Time Protocol (NTP)

  1. Install the NTP package: First, you'll need to install the ntp package. Open a terminal and run:
sudo apt update
sudo apt install ntp
sudo apt update
sudo apt install ntp
  1. Stop the systemd-timesyncd service: Debian11 uses systemd-timesyncd by default for time synchronization. Before using ntp, it's a good idea to stop and disable this service to avoid conflicts.
sudo systemctl stop systemd-timesyncd
sudo systemctl disable systemd-timesyncd
sudo systemctl stop systemd-timesyncd
sudo systemctl disable systemd-timesyncd

Configure the NTP client: Edit the NTP configuration file using a text editor like nano:

sudo nano /etc/ntp.conf
sudo nano /etc/ntp.conf

Find the lines that start with pool or server. By default, Debian11 uses the NTP servers provided by the NTP Pool Project. If you want to use a predefined NTP server, replace these lines or add a new line:

server your.ntp.server.address iburst
server your.ntp.server.address iburst

Replace your.ntp.server.address with the address of your predefined NTP server. The iburst option sends a burst of packets if the server does not respond to the first query.

Save and exit the file (in nano, press CTRL + X, then Y, then Enter).

Start the NTP service:

sudo systemctl start ntp
sudo systemctl start ntp

Enable the NTP service to start on boot:

sudo systemctl enable ntp
sudo systemctl enable ntp

Verify the synchronization: After a few minutes, you can check the synchronization status with:

ntpq -p
ntpq -p

This will show a list of NTP servers your machine is syncing with. The asterisk (*) next to a server indicates that your system's time is being synchronized with that server.

Adjust the firewall (if necessary): If you have a firewall enabled, you might need to allow NTP traffic. For ufw (Uncomplicated Firewall), you can do this with:

sudo ufw allow 123/udp
sudo ufw allow 123/udp

That's it! Your Olive system should now be synchronizing its time with the predefined NTP server. Remember to periodically check the synchronization status and monitor the NTP service to ensure accurate timekeeping.

Downloads

TypeFormatVersionLink
3D Models
OBJ1.0Download
DAE1.0Download

Mechanical Details

Olive-Camera_Base!

Olive-Camera_Cover!

Olive-Camera_Asm!